Patrick Boyd’s Garden

Thanks Patrick, APLD Southwest Chapter member,  for opening your home and garden for our last chapter meeting.  Not only is it a pleasure to see the garden but to also understand the thought process that went into the layout, what worked, what did not and the plans for the future as the garden evolves.

Here are a few photos from his garden.  Enjoy!

Streetside

Streetside

Walk to House

As you arrive at Patrick’s house, the space between the sidewalk and fence is over flowing with Texas bush sage, rosemary, lantana and cactus.  The plant selections offered an interesting mix of textures and colors while providing a barrier from the street.

The walk from the entry gate to the house is broken slabs of concrete laid out in flagstone style.  As you can see, the property has many large trees which required a mix of shade tolerant plants.

The walk to the front door is bordered on either side by a wide selection of plants including inland sea oats, American beauty berry and Turk’s cap.

American Beauty Berry

American Beauty Berry

The American beauty berry shrubs were covered in vibrant purple berries.

Fireplace

Fireplace

The lush plantings where punctuated with ornamental details included a unique metal fireplace and small raised square fountain.

Fountain

Fountain

Image

Julie Ryan presentation_v3

Dallas Blooms @ the Dallas Arboretum

Its that time of year at the Dallas Arboretum.  Its Dallas Blooms!  For more information visit their website at Dallas Arboretum

Blooms Webpage.indd

Designer of the Month – March 2013

Patrick L Boyd

Patrick L Boyd

PATRICK L BOYD

Senior Design Associate
David Rolston Landscape Architects
The Meadows Building
5646 Milton, Suite 329
Dallas, TX 75206

contact info: member’s profile

company info: website

Patrick, a native of Dallas, grew up traveling the state, learning as a child to appreciate the native beauty of Texas. His passion for horticulture was instilled in him at an early age from his mother and grandmother, who were avid gardeners.

Currently, he and his partner reside in a restored 1910 farmhouse on half-acre wooded property in the Ravinia Heights neighborhood of Oak Cliff, a beautiful area of Dallas made up of rolling hills, cliffs and many trees. His large yard is an evolving laboratory for his passion of gardening, landscape design and construction.

While Patrick’s College Degree is in Fashion Design, he never strayed far away from his love of Architecture and Landscape Design. He decided to change careers in his thirties to follow that love.

Patrick has worked with David Rolston Landscape Architects since 1996. He began at Rolston & Bonick, the firm’s now closed popular Dallas garden shop, as a buyer and landscape designer. He still enjoys the hunt for the unique and unusual garden antiques, ornaments and accessories to incorporate such finds into his landscape designs. By specifying exterior furniture, fabric, accessories and architectural paint choices congruent with a landscape design plan, Patrick is able to provide his clients a balanced and cohesive design, tailored to suit their individual requirements and aesthetics.

As an avid traveler, Patrick plans his wandering around opportunities to tour private gardens, landscapes of merit and historic properties, keeping his finger on the pulse of emerging design trends.

Patrick’s design philosophy is best summed up as: “The understanding of Plants, their colors, textures, seasonal changes and how all this relates to the built Environment is of upmost importance to my aesthetic sense and designs.”

Patrick has been involved with numerous organizations, including the Old Oak Cliff Conservation League, Oak Cliff Garden Tour and Preservation Dallas. He is currently the Dallas Chairman of The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program. The relationship with the Open Days Program has afforded his access to many wonderful private gardens that most people do not get to see and his hope is to include some of these in future Open Days events.

Before - Click to Enlarge

Before – Click to Enlarge

Before - Click to Enlarge

Before – Click to Enlarge

One such project, is in Ft.Worth and was completed in early 2012. This project is a perfect example of how all the design elements came together in a very dynamic way. The client’s house, a 1950’s era long low “ranch”, sits high up off the street on a slightly pie shaped lot. The grade change of between 10-12 feet

After - Click to Enlarge

After – Click to Enlarge

and the curved lot are what inspired Patrick in the design concept. Where using stone as retaining walls would be the status quo, Patrick has been using weathering steel (Cor-Ten is one brand

After - Click to Enlarge

After – Click to Enlarge

name) in projects of late, including in his own garden. The client was very excited to use this element to push the

envelope on their garden. What really sets the design apart is the use of the steel in a serpentine line across the land,

After - Click to Enlarge

After – Click to Enlarge

dropping down as it goes from north to south and “interrupted” with Silvermist stone slabs as steps.

Upon arriving to the upper part of the garden,

After - Click to Enlarge

After – Click to Enlarge

you’ll find a terrace of crushed granite sand that is used to provide a place

to view the garden while relaxing around a raw steel fire pit, which becomes a cocktail table in the warmer months.

“I endeavor to design landscapes that respond to the local, natural environment and are

geared towards a client’s unique property and the relationship between their lifestyle and their landscape… how they live in their landscape.”

Typical of this era of home, planters tucked deep under the eaves of the roof make plant growth difficult. This presented a design opportunity which Patrick used to create a fountain feature. Stainless steel scuppers pour water into a lower basin formed with large blocks of Silvermist stone, that in turn form an oval seating area around the granite sand fire pit terrace.

Plantings are a judicious mix of Texas Natives and adaptive plants, grasses, perennials and understory trees, including a mix of sun and shade plants, in response to the gardens existing beautiful large oak trees.

The clients have said that their expectations for their garden were completely surpassed with this design and now spend as much time in the front yard as they do in the owner/Master Gardener designed backyard. The Owner says, “Never a day goes by that neighbors and strangers don’t stop and actually walk up into the garden, such is the intrigue of it all”.

Greenway Parks, Dallas Mini-Tour

Peaking Through the Fence

Peaking Through the Fence

We didn’t plan to go on a mini-tour of the neighborhood landscapes but that is one of the things you can do with a smaller group.  So why not?  The APLD Southwest Chapter meeting  began with discussing some observations made on the drive in.  “What was that plant on the corner?”  “Did you see….?”  We headed down the street from our meeting site to answer those questions.  And one thing led to another and off we go down the

Greenway Parks, Dallas Mini-tour

Greenway Parks, Dallas Mini-tour

street, cutting back and forth critiquing landscapes as we go.  Not only is it interesting to see different styles of landscapes, plant selections, hardscape choices but it also encourages each of us to move out of our design ruts and to try something different.  That’s is what it is all about… to become the best landscape designer that you can be.

- David Castagno, Landscape Studio

Designer of the Month – April 2012

PAM AUGUST

August Landscape Design
Houston, TX

contact info: member’s profile

company info: website

Houston. Summer temps in the triple digits. Torrential rain and flooding one year, drought the next. Balmy winters for ten years, then two in a row below freezing. What’s a landscape designer to do? It seems the list of tried and true plants that can withstand these unpredictable seasons has been winnowed down in the last few years in the Houston area.

I’m originally from New Jersey, and didn’t delve into the world of landscape design until I moved to Houston 26 years ago. Since then, I’ve been learning and revising my horticultural choices based a lot on the weather, but also on what clients request. Nantucket window boxes? Not so easy to maintain in the heat and humidity. A tropical paradise? Yes, until it dips below 32 degrees. So creative substitution seems like a good way to go: using planting materials that can give you the Nantucket or tropical look, but that can take the heat (and cold).

Plan Front Yard

I put this idea to the test a few months ago when I met with a lovely young couple who had just moved to Houston from London and needed landscaping for their new home. They had purchased and renovated a charming bungalow and wanted the landscaping to look like an English country garden. They showed me magazine photos of wonderful gardens overflowing with roses and flowering perennials. Beautiful. The only catch was that their front yard was in full shade, thanks to an enormous live oak.

Plan back Yard

The solution was to use a variety of plants that do well in shady conditions but have a soft, cottagey look, such as eleagnus, podocarpus, ligularia, dianella and holly fern as a backdrop, with seasonal flowers in the foreground to give a punch of color. The layout of the space was also important in achieving our look so a wide, curvy flagstone and gravel walk was built and the beds were gently curved. The old, cracked concrete driveway was removed and replaced with Black Star gravel. The client wanted to maintain a grassy area, so we use ‘Zorro’, a shade-tolerant variety of zoysia.

Front Yard – Click to enlarge

Front Yard – Click to enlarge

Back Yard – Click to enlarge

Back Yard – Click to enlarge

Driveway – Click to enlarge

Achieving the country garden look in the back yard was easier since it gets a lot of sun. However, we had other issues to deal with, such as providing privacy from neighboring buildings and camouflaging an unsightly utility pole, wires and a concrete fence. We used Eagleston holly trees along the back that with time will give some visual relief from these issues. Fig ivy was planted to eventually cover the concrete fence. Plant materials used throughout the beds include euryops, angelonia, plumbago, society garlic, salvia varieties, roses, citrus trees, cleyera, dianella and seasonals . I designed the little picket fence sections to make sure everyone knew it was a cottage garden. The back yard is a work in progress and there are plans to add a fountain in the center of the yard and a vegetable garden along a sunny fence line.

All in all, the project turned out very well and, most importantly, the clients were very pleased. The project could not have been the success that it is without the expert installation by Bella Terra Landscape Resources, headed by owner Nancy Simpson and installation manager Humberto Bolanos.

Mid-Year Dinner Gathering

Great seeing everybody at the August chapter meeting.  Good conversation, good food, and even better company.  As we stepped out of the restaurant we stopped in our tracks as Maribeth, our chapter President, mentioned that she bought a new car!  A Lamborghini?  Some years are better than others and this must have been one of those better years I thought.  I begin to walk to my white truck.  Oh, she says, its the yellow one.  We laugh.  It has been a good year after all